African Hip Hop and Mental Health

In this podcast Hip-Hop in Africa students discuss various aspects of mental health. They talk about African artists who have spoken out about their battles with depression. The students then engaged in a very honest and open discussion with hip hop ambassador, poet, and rapper Toni Blackman. She detailed bridging the gap between the privilege of mental health and hip hop culture. Toni Blackman expounds upon her own personal advocacies, projects, and efforts geared towards bridging the gap between the two worlds while using her platform as a international rapper.

Artists Mentioned:
Gigi Lamayne – https://soundcloud.com/gigi_lamayne
PatricKxxLee – https://soundcloud.com/patrickxxlee
Nthabi –  https://soundcloud.com/msnthabi
Toni Blackman website: https://www.toniblackmanpresents.com
Hip Hop meditation soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/missblackman1

Research – Hip hop and mental health – https://www.newframe.com/hip-hop-and-mental-health
Mental Illness: Invisible but devastating – https://www.un.org/africarenewal/magazine/december-2016-march-2017/mental-illness-invisible-devastating
Video: WTFIMH—What The Fuck Is Mental Health?
Song: https://youtu.be/6EkBXb1vaHU

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