Featured

Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers

ClarkcoverComing May 2018: Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers by Msia Kibona Clark. Pre-orders are available NOW! 

Throughout Africa, artists use hip-hop both to describe their lives and to create shared spaces for uncensored social commentary, feminist challenges to patriarchy, and resistance against state institutions, while at the same time engaging with the global hip-hop community. In Hip-Hop in Africa, Msia Kibona Clark examines some of Africa’s biggest hip-hop scenes and shows how hip-hop helps us understand specifically African narratives of social, political, and economic realities.

Continue reading “Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers”

African Battle Cry

Video taken at the African Battle Cry held in December 2017 in Cape Town by Heal the Hood.

Call for Submissions: Hip Hop Studies

This is an exciting new book series being launched by the University of California Press and being led by H. Samy Alim and Jeff Chang.

The University of California Press’s Hip Hop Studies Series represents a landmark moment in scholarly work on Hip Hop Culture. The series publishes critical, accessible books by innovative thinkers exploring Hip Hop’s cultural, musical, social, and political impact around the world—from Los Angeles to London to Lagos and all points beyond and in between. International and interdisciplinary in scope, we welcome authors who seek to engage, challenge, and extend the central theoretical and methodological debates in Hip Hop Studies, research, and scholarship. Like Hip Hop Culture itself, the series advances original, creative, public-facing, social justice-oriented, dope intellectual work.

For more information: https://www.ucpress.edu/series.php?ser=cshhs

HHAP Episode 18: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press). 

Dr. Williams is a Senior Lecturer in the Linguistics Department at the University of Western Cape. He has published papers and book chapters on the performance of multilingualism, popular cultural practices (specifically Hip Hop), agency and voice in urban multilingual spaces. In addition to the book we’ll be discussing today, he is also currently editing the book Kaapse Styles: Hip Hop Art & Activism in Cape Town, South Africa.

Dr. Williams has been writing on language and hip hop in South Africa for several years, and has extensive credibility within South Africa’s well established hip hop community. Dr. Williams’ research and work has also made valuable contributions to the field of linguistics.  

In this interview we discuss the book, Dr. Williams research on South African hip hop, and ultimately his place as a Coloured man from the Cape Flats in one of the oldest and largest hip hop scenes in Africa. 

Episode Breakdown

6:24 – Being a hip hop sociolinguist & self reflection in the book.
7:50 – The arena of freestyle rap battles
11:35 – His work with the group Suburban Menace
16:05 – Hip hop research and scholarship, & the responsibility to the subjects of the research
22:43 – His experiences in the Cape Flats township of Bishop Lavis during hip hop’s days of hip hop, during the last years of the anti-apartheid struggle
29:10 – Relationships between Black & Coloured hip hop heads
38:05 – Different hip hop language varieties in South Africa
39:40 – Braggadocio, and its place and purpose in hip hop
45:00 – Masculinity & toughness in hip hop
49:24 – Dr. Williams concept of “Body Rap”, respectability politics, the pornification of hip hop culture, & rape culture within hip hop culture*
58:12 – Women navigating masculine hip hop spaces
1:07:44 – The diverse audiences that this book speaks to

*Dr. Williams defines Body Rap as “a sub-genre of local rap, where the overarching theme in the lyrics is the sexualization and often the denigration of women’s bodies, performed for the pleasure of men”.

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press).

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 18: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa”

Happy New Year

Call for Submissions: Show & Prove 2018 Hip Hop Studies Conference

Show & Prove 2018 Hip Hop Studies ConferenceDecember 7-9, 2018 | Riverside, CA
CALL FOR PAPERS/ PANELS/ PERFORMANCES/ WORkSHOPSSubmissions are due by the 14th of April, 2018For more information: http://www.showandproveconference.com/sp-2018-cfp

HHAP Episode 18: Meyniak On Hip Hop, Poetry, & Politics in Zimbabwe

This month we’re releasing a bonus episode. We interviewed Zimbabwean hip hop and spoken word artist Meyniak. He’s a young artist based in Harare and has a unique style and unconventional musical path that led him to hip hop. In this short interview, we spoke about his music, his poetry, hip hop in Zimbabwe, and the relationship between hip hop artists and the state.

Episode Breakdown
5:10 I Peasant 
7:43 Past you
10:30 Interview
30:58 Ma Nna

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/meyniakartist
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/meyniak
Twitter: https://twitter.com/meyniak__

21151710_1485290664882975_5477665560345796127_nThis month we’re releasing a bonus episode of the show. We interviewed Zimbabwean hip hop and spoken word artist Meyniak. He’s a young artist based in Harare and has a unique style and unconventional musical path that led him to hip hop. In this short interview, we spoke about his music, his poetry, hip hop in Zimbabwe, and the relationship between hip hop artists and the state.

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 18: Meyniak On Hip Hop, Poetry, & Politics in Zimbabwe”

The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop & Christianity in Kenya

9780252081552_lgThe Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop and Christianity in Kenya by Mwenda Ntarangwi

Published by University of Illinois Press

The bass meets the beatified in Kenya’s dynamic youth culture

Continue reading “The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop & Christianity in Kenya”