HHAP Ep. 68: Edem, On Navigating the Music Industry in Ghana

In this episode, Ghanaian hip hop & hiplife artist Edem talks about the music industry in Ghana and the popularity of Afrobeats. Edem also talks about the presence of Ghanaian and Nigerian artists in shaping Black popular music globally, especially in the US and the UK. He also talks about how Ghanians have always done music according to their own rules, creating genres and trends like highlife, hiplife, and azonto; and innovating hip hop and Afrobeats.

We also talk about being Ewe and why language and identity are important in his work. Coming from Ghana’s Volta region, he’s one of the first hip hop artist to begin rapping in Ewe.

Edem’s music is a mix of hip hop, hiplife, and dancehall. He released his 1st album, Volta Regime in 2009, followed by 2 more albums and the recent EP Mood Swings released last year. Throughout his career he’s collaborated with several international artists, and has won and/or been been nominated for several music awards, including the Black Canadian Awards, the Ghana Music Awards, and the 4syte (for-sight) TV Music Video Awards.

Edem is on Twitter at @iamedem https://twitter.com/iamedem and Instagram at @iamedemgh https://www.instagram.com/iamedemgh and YouTube at @iamEdem https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXwdOmMKtY9-NXjDq-yqxYg

This episode is part of the special series that we did in partnership with Words Beats & Life. The series was recorded and live streamed with students in the Hip Hop in Africa class at Howard University and George Washington University.

Reviews by A&K

In this episode of reviews by A&K — brought to you by Kate & Iriana — we’ll be breaking down our opinions of Ghanaian artist

The UK through the lens of The African diaspora

For this mixtape, I focused on the modern rap scene in the United Kingdom, more specifically England. All of the artists in the mixtape are

celebrate the female braggadocio

From the outsider’s gaze, hip hop is at times seen as monolithic and is trivialized by the outsider’s perspective – labelled as materialistic, unnecessary, and

Connecting Your Worlds: Intersectionality

I grew up as a military kid. My ma and dad were in the military so even though they were separated, I was always on

Focus on Ghana: LGBT+ Allyship as Queer Work

We have featured the work of several queer artists in Africa, as well as the increasing number of artists who are allies. This video is

1 2 3 30