Dialects of Hip-Hop

The song BRKN LNGWJZ by FOKN Bois is a song that really embodies the discussion revolving around the use of different languages in social settings. FOKN Bois is a Ghanaian rap group that consists of Wanlov the Kubolor and M3nsa. In this song, Wanlov and M3nsa talk about what makes them who they are and what things are important to their identity. Throughout the song they rap in english as well as simultaneously using a dialect of english, Twi (a dialect spoken in Ghana) words. The use of language in this song is to aid them in revealing their identities. Continue reading “Dialects of Hip-Hop”

Sarkodie

Every artist from Ghana has their own special kind of style. I came across Sarkodie and instantly became very interested in his particular sound. Sarkodie has a way of entwining English and Ghanian slang together with such a nice flow that makes you think oh snap let me hear something else. One song that stuck out to me the most was Adonai, he talks about the powers of God the almighty, how he was saved from his troubled past by the lord. Continue reading “Sarkodie”

M.anifest Touches the Heart with New Single ‘Me Ne Woa’

Crowned King of Ghana Hip-Hop in 2017, M.anifest is nothing to play with.  He is known for being a triple threat in the music business, as he is a rapper, singer, and songwriter.  In most of his crafts he incorporates both his native tongue and English.  An example of this is from one of his new songs, his single, Me No Woa (You and I) feat. King Promise.  From the looks of it, this song is speaking about his grind interfering with his relationship. Apparently, he’s been gone for some time, focusing on his music career, living the life of a popular musician and neglection is surfacing… Continue reading “M.anifest Touches the Heart with New Single ‘Me Ne Woa’”

Blitz the Ambassador: A Diaspora Messenger

Blitz the Ambassador was born in Ghana. Growing up he idolized Nas. After gaining notoriety after recording part of the song “Deeba”. One of his songs, recorded in the states, “Dikembe” is a clear ode to his heritage. While he employs Nas-like verse form and style, his lyrics clearly put Africa in the spotlight. A critical line in the song is: “The African attack, Yese wo kum apim a apim beva, chale koko da, let me translate: you can’t fuck with us” is subtly saying “back off” to European/the west in general. He means that Africa has something important to offer and its artists should be valued. In the music video he wears African fabric on his shoulders, making it known that he is proud of his heritage. Another line that has fantastic historical meaning is inserted into his song: “spitting at these lames, watch them touch down in Africa, get snatched for their chains.” This lyric has many layers. One of them might be the fact that Africans and black culture are rarely credited and recognized. Too often their work is stolen or used without mention of its influence. Chains can refer to the stereotypical rapper sporting gold chains, but it also alludes to slavery and the diaspora itself. Blitz the Ambassador clearly knows that his success is partly due to his move to the United States. While his lyrics in this song might not show it, he demonstrates American influence through his clothes. In this video he wears a baseball cap, jeans, and a black shirt. He combines this with an African print scarf, which shows a blending of two worlds. He also references another famous African figure that is popular in the US, Dikembe. Dikembe Mutombo is a basketball player in the United States and is known for his Internet meme. Blitz the Ambassador shows he knows how music is transnational and crosses borders with this line: “I’m in Morroco, penning another classic for the masses.”

 

STORMZY

Stormzy whose real name is Micheal Ebenezer Kwadjo Omari Owuo is a Ghanaian-British rapper who is currently based in the UK. He has a large fan base throughout the UK with many No 1 singles and a UK No 1 album titled Gang Signs & Prayer. His album Gang Signs and Prayer is nothing short from phenomenal and inspiring. In this album, he sheds the light on living in a society where all odds are against him. But he was able to use Rap to overcome the temptations and danger that come with living in a gang prone locality. Continue reading “STORMZY”

It didn’t start with the March for Our Lives…

Recent performer in the March for Our Lives, Ghanian-American Victor Kwesi Mensha or Vic Mensa is an exemplary figure of the African diaspora, utilizing his voice to express discontent for issues of his disenfranchised people. Since debuting in 2013 on the Chance the Rapper mixtape (his childhood friend) Acid Rap, Chicago native has earned a top spot on XXL Magazine’s 2014 freshman class and released two albums—The Autobiography and There’s A lot Going On. Continue reading “It didn’t start with the March for Our Lives…”

Blitz the Ambassador’s Concoction

Blitz the Ambassador, a Ghanaian rap artist, has been influential in the concoction of African culture and American culture within his music.  Based in Brooklyn, New York, the basis of Hip-Hop is prevalent in his craft while still honoring his roots.  Let’s take a look at his 2016 video for his song “Running”. Continue reading “Blitz the Ambassador’s Concoction”

Diaspora Rappers

Diaspora based artists like K’Naan, Blitz the Ambassador, M3nsa, Wale, and French Montana, and Tabi Bonney have been covered heavily in this blog. There are several other first and second generation African MCs around the world who have not been covered as much in this blog. As students in the Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa course this semester are discussing Diaspora based artists, here are some of the artists those students are looking at. In the coming week students will be putting up posts on these and other African MCs that are based outside of the continent. Continue reading “Diaspora Rappers”

Rap and Me

Eyirap is a well known female MC from Accra, Ghana. She is extremely talented and her song “Rap and Me” makes sure no one forgets it. Eyirap uses this song to tell the world she is the best in the game and no one can tell her otherwise.

“I understand the game so always I deliver..”

“Take me to the war zone and I’ll face Hitler..”

“I’m business minded I have come to annihilate..”

Eyirap uses the lyrics above as a sort of braggadocio. She establishes her dominance and credibility by saying that she can kill off anyone with her rapping ability. Continue reading “Rap and Me”

Eno Barony says She’s Not About to Play with Y’all.

You think being a female rapper in America is hard?  Imagine coming up on the scene in Ghana as a female rapper. The music business shows no mercy.  Hailing from the country of Ghana, Eno Barony is a female rapper who was put on the scene with her first single “Tonga” in 2014.  Since then she has had a major impact on the hip hop culture in Ghana. Continue reading “Eno Barony says She’s Not About to Play with Y’all.”