Didier Awadi: The Roots

The song “The Roots” rapped by Didier Awadi and M1. It is a striking stand against imperialism and white superiority. The song says: “I ain’t a black man, I am an African.” This might be used to describe the way non-blacks perceive all black people as the same. Continue reading “Didier Awadi: The Roots”

HHAP Episode 3: Xuman and Keyti on Hip Hop Culture in Senegal

This episode features an interview with Senegalese hip hop pioneers and activists Xuman and Keyti. Xuman and Keyti have been active in hip hop in Senegal for over 20 years. They now host a hip hop news show called Journal Rappé on YouTube. The episode featured on this podcast features the U.S. rapper M1.

Journal Rappé: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCImRGQL_sK7OHi1h823Nc0w

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This episode features an interview with Senegalese hip hop pioneers and activists Xuman and Keyti. Xuman and Keyti have been active in hip hop in Senegal for over 20 years. They now host a hip hop news show called Journal Rappé on YouTube. The episode featured on this podcast features the U.S. rapper M1.

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 3: Xuman and Keyti on Hip Hop Culture in Senegal”

Gibril Da African

From all over West and hailing Accra, Ghana Gibril, a.k.a. The Foreign Exchange Hustler’s mother is from Ghana and father is from Sierra Leone and has spent time throughout the West African coast, learning, traveling, performing in Ghana, Togo, and Nigeria to name a few and has also spent time in and around many European countries. He has taken the U.S. by storm, performing and staying in Chicago, New Jersey, New York and elsewhere to bridge the Atlantic from the West Coast of Africa to the East Coast of America. His multi-national and multi-cultural heritage and lifestyle are reflected in his latest album “Diplomatic Passport” and the song sharing the same title, “Passport.” He brings a hard-hitting style that comes from his exposure to Civil War and constant poverty stricken bloodshed from childhood on. From his myspace page you can listen to his song “All I Know” and get a taste of his life. His international acclaim took off when he collaborated with M1 from Dead Prez in the song “Streets of Africa” which is an amazing tune that shows not only the true nature of violence in Africa and the income gap between the few wealthy and the mass poor but also with the help of the prophetic and wise M1 from Dead Prez showing how this same expanding gap between the rich and poor breeds the constant violence in the streets of America.

“Streets of Africa” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSNT9HaYzi4&feature=related

“Passport” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RIkNad11QY

“All I Know” on his myspace http://www.myspace.com/gibrildaafrican

Documentary ‘Ni Wakati’ Brings American, East African Artists Together

Los Angeles — The new documentary by Kenyan filmmakers Michael Wanguhu and Russell Kenya premiered at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles this year. It proved to be a good year for Kenyan film, with eight films set in the country.

Ni Wakati is a documentary that deals with issues including the state of hip hop, connections between Africans and African Americans, and the struggles between commercialized and conscious hip hop.

Continue reading “Documentary ‘Ni Wakati’ Brings American, East African Artists Together”