HHAP Episode 29: Ghanaian Hip Hop Scholar Joseph Ewoodzie on Hip Hop in the South Bronx

Ghana born, Bronx raised hip hop scholar Joseph Ewoodzie has published the book Break Beats in the Bronx: Rediscovering Hip-Hop’s Early Years, a book that uncovers details of hip hop’s early years in the South Bronx. Ewoodzie’s book provides rich details of hip hop’s history in the South Bronx. In this interview he discusses his decision to write the book and touches on some of the major themes the book addresses. For example, Ewoodzie talks about the social economic environment in the South Bronx that gave rise to hip hop, environments that mirrored the environments that gave rise to hip hop in Africa.

In the interview we also cover the book’s

Discussion of the link between gang culture and hip hop
The controversies around Afrika Bambaataa
The rise and decline of the visibility of the DJ in mainstream hip hop
The connection between hip hop culture and Africa’s oral tradition
The connections between music in Africa and the Diaspora
South Bronx Ghanaian immigrants in the development of hip hop
The origins of the masculinization of hip hop
The book can be purchased at: uncpress.org/book/9781469632759/break-beats-in-the-bronx

Joseph Ewoodzie can be followed on Twitter at twitter.com/piko_e

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HHAP Special Episode: Hip-Hop in Africa Book Talk

This is a special episode of the Hip Hop African Podcast. This episode is a conversation between Dr. Msia Kibona Clark, the author of Hip-Hop in Africa, and moderator Dr. James Pope. Dr. Pope is a professor at Winston Salem State University and an organizer with the Africa World Now Project. The conversation took place at the legendary Sankofa Video Book and Cafe in Washington, DC. The event was sponsored by the following organizations Africa World Now Project | Africans Rising for Justice, Peace, & Dignity | Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) | Sankofa Books
 
If you are listing to the podcast on a platform other than the blogsite, you can access some of the images from the evening’s event on our blogsite: hiphopafrican.com.

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Hip-Hop in Africa Book Talk

This Sunday, the 20th of May, the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art will host a book talk for the new book Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City & Dustyfoot Philosophers

facebook.com/events/594670134237230/

Call for Submissions: Hip Hop Studies

This is an exciting new book series being launched by the University of California Press and being led by H. Samy Alim and Jeff Chang.

The University of California Press’s Hip Hop Studies Series represents a landmark moment in scholarly work on Hip Hop Culture. The series publishes critical, accessible books by innovative thinkers exploring Hip Hop’s cultural, musical, social, and political impact around the world—from Los Angeles to London to Lagos and all points beyond and in between. International and interdisciplinary in scope, we welcome authors who seek to engage, challenge, and extend the central theoretical and methodological debates in Hip Hop Studies, research, and scholarship. Like Hip Hop Culture itself, the series advances original, creative, public-facing, social justice-oriented, dope intellectual work.

For more information: https://www.ucpress.edu/series.php?ser=cshhs

HHAP Episode 19: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press). 

Dr. Williams is a Senior Lecturer in the Linguistics Department at the University of Western Cape. He has published papers and book chapters on the performance of multilingualism, popular cultural practices (specifically Hip Hop), agency and voice in urban multilingual spaces. In addition to the book we’ll be discussing today, he is also currently editing the book Kaapse Styles: Hip Hop Art & Activism in Cape Town, South Africa.

Dr. Williams has been writing on language and hip hop in South Africa for several years, and has extensive credibility within South Africa’s well established hip hop community. Dr. Williams’ research and work has also made valuable contributions to the field of linguistics.  

In this interview we discuss the book, Dr. Williams research on South African hip hop, and ultimately his place as a Coloured man from the Cape Flats in one of the oldest and largest hip hop scenes in Africa. 

Episode Breakdown

6:24 – Being a hip hop sociolinguist & self reflection in the book.
7:50 – The arena of freestyle rap battles
11:35 – His work with the group Suburban Menace
16:05 – Hip hop research and scholarship, & the responsibility to the subjects of the research
22:43 – His experiences in the Cape Flats township of Bishop Lavis during hip hop’s days of hip hop, during the last years of the anti-apartheid struggle
29:10 – Relationships between Black & Coloured hip hop heads
38:05 – Different hip hop language varieties in South Africa
39:40 – Braggadocio, and its place and purpose in hip hop
45:00 – Masculinity & toughness in hip hop
49:24 – Dr. Williams concept of “Body Rap”, respectability politics, the pornification of hip hop culture, & rape culture within hip hop culture*
58:12 – Women navigating masculine hip hop spaces
1:07:44 – The diverse audiences that this book speaks to

*Dr. Williams defines Body Rap as “a sub-genre of local rap, where the overarching theme in the lyrics is the sexualization and often the denigration of women’s bodies, performed for the pleasure of men”.

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press).

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 19: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa”

Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers

ClarkcoverHip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers by Msia Kibona Clark 

Throughout Africa, artists use hip-hop both to describe their lives and to create shared spaces for uncensored social commentary, feminist challenges to patriarchy, and resistance against state institutions, while at the same time engaging with the global hip-hop community. In Hip-Hop in Africa, Msia Kibona Clark examines some of Africa’s biggest hip-hop scenes and shows how hip-hop helps us understand specifically African narratives of social, political, and economic realities.

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The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop & Christianity in Kenya

9780252081552_lgThe Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop and Christianity in Kenya by Mwenda Ntarangwi

Published by University of Illinois Press

The bass meets the beatified in Kenya’s dynamic youth culture

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New Book on Hip Hop in Morocco

Moreno Almeida, Cristina. (2017). Rap Beyond Resistance: Staging Power in Contemporary Morocco. Palgrave Macmillan. 

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Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati

by Msia Kibona Clark and Mickie Mwanzia Koster

Now available in paperback & on Kindle

https://www.amazon.com/Hip-Hop-Social-Change-Africa/dp/1498505805

This book examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati

by Msia Kibona Clark and Mickie Mwanzia Koster

Now available in paperback & on Kindle

https://www.amazon.com/Hip-Hop-Social-Change-Africa/dp/1498505805

This book examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

Continue reading “Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati”

Wala Bok: Une histoire orale du hip hop au Senegal (An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal)

Wala Bok: Une histoire orale du hip hop au Senegal: An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal by Fatou Kande Senghor

[Please note: This book is published in French language text.] Wala Bok: An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal explores and reflects on the evolution of generations of hip hop artistes and practitioners, from the early pioneers to the new kids on the block, producers, and the social critics involved in this complex movement. In Senegal, hip hop has been very political from the go, from ‘Set Setal’ cleanliness campaigns of the 80s and 90s, to the Y’en a marre movement that became instrumental to derailing the monarchic wishes of an octogenarian president to usher in a second ‘alternance’ in 2012. The images and testimonies of this movement, shaped by the recognition for cultural diversity and motivated by the quest for making the world a better place, unveil a heterogeneous eclectic community pulled between individual artistic promotion and political commitment. Includes photographs and contributions from scholars such as Greg Thomas, Eugene Adams, Ousmane Sene, Abdoulaye Niang and many hip hop artistes and practitioners in Senegal including Daara J Family, Didier Awadi, Fou Malade, Keur Gui, Daddy Bibson, Lord Alajiman, Chronik 2H, ALIF, Moona, Rapattack and many others. Kande Senghor studied cinema, civilizations and languages at the Universite Charles de Gaulle in Lille, France. She worked with the director Wim Wenders on The Invisible (2007), a documentary on women raped by the May May fighters during the civil war in Congo. She was a privileged collaborator of Sembene Ousmane. In 2006, she presented photographic works in the exhibition Snap Judgements at the invitation of Okwui Enwezor at the New York Contemporary Photography Museum. The documentary The Other in Me (2012) explores the threads in connection, identity, belonging and the Diaspora between two identical twin brothers. In 2015, her documentary film Giving Birth on the enigmatic Senegalese sculptor Seni Camara was an official selection at the Venice Biennale.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/2359260154/ref=cm_sw_r_oth_api_7aX6xbT5HXA7D