Call for Submissions: Hip Hop Studies

This is an exciting new book series being launched by the University of California Press and being led by H. Samy Alim and Jeff Chang.

The University of California Press’s Hip Hop Studies Series represents a landmark moment in scholarly work on Hip Hop Culture. The series publishes critical, accessible books by innovative thinkers exploring Hip Hop’s cultural, musical, social, and political impact around the world—from Los Angeles to London to Lagos and all points beyond and in between. International and interdisciplinary in scope, we welcome authors who seek to engage, challenge, and extend the central theoretical and methodological debates in Hip Hop Studies, research, and scholarship. Like Hip Hop Culture itself, the series advances original, creative, public-facing, social justice-oriented, dope intellectual work.

For more information: https://www.ucpress.edu/series.php?ser=cshhs

HHAP Episode 18: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press). 

Dr. Williams is a Senior Lecturer in the Linguistics Department at the University of Western Cape. He has published papers and book chapters on the performance of multilingualism, popular cultural practices (specifically Hip Hop), agency and voice in urban multilingual spaces. In addition to the book we’ll be discussing today, he is also currently editing the book Kaapse Styles: Hip Hop Art & Activism in Cape Town, South Africa.

Dr. Williams has been writing on language and hip hop in South Africa for several years, and has extensive credibility within South Africa’s well established hip hop community. Dr. Williams’ research and work has also made valuable contributions to the field of linguistics.  

In this interview we discuss the book, Dr. Williams research on South African hip hop, and ultimately his place as a Coloured man from the Cape Flats in one of the oldest and largest hip hop scenes in Africa. 

Episode Breakdown

6:24 – Being a hip hop sociolinguist & self reflection in the book.
7:50 – The arena of freestyle rap battles
11:35 – His work with the group Suburban Menace
16:05 – Hip hop research and scholarship, & the responsibility to the subjects of the research
22:43 – His experiences in the Cape Flats township of Bishop Lavis during hip hop’s days of hip hop, during the last years of the anti-apartheid struggle
29:10 – Relationships between Black & Coloured hip hop heads
38:05 – Different hip hop language varieties in South Africa
39:40 – Braggadocio, and its place and purpose in hip hop
45:00 – Masculinity & toughness in hip hop
49:24 – Dr. Williams concept of “Body Rap”, respectability politics, the pornification of hip hop culture, & rape culture within hip hop culture*
58:12 – Women navigating masculine hip hop spaces
1:07:44 – The diverse audiences that this book speaks to

*Dr. Williams defines Body Rap as “a sub-genre of local rap, where the overarching theme in the lyrics is the sexualization and often the denigration of women’s bodies, performed for the pleasure of men”.

This episode, South African hip hop scholar and sociolinguist Dr. Quentin Williams discusses his new book Remix Multilingualism: Hip Hop, Ethnography and Performing Marginalized Voice (Bloomsbury Press).

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 18: Quentin Williams on Multilingualism & Hip Hop in South Africa”

Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers

ClarkcoverComing May 2018: Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers by Msia Kibona Clark. Pre-orders are available NOW! 

Throughout Africa, artists use hip-hop both to describe their lives and to create shared spaces for uncensored social commentary, feminist challenges to patriarchy, and resistance against state institutions, while at the same time engaging with the global hip-hop community. In Hip-Hop in Africa, Msia Kibona Clark examines some of Africa’s biggest hip-hop scenes and shows how hip-hop helps us understand specifically African narratives of social, political, and economic realities.

Continue reading “Hip-Hop in Africa: Prophets of the City and Dustyfoot Philosophers”

The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop & Christianity in Kenya

9780252081552_lgThe Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop and Christianity in Kenya by Mwenda Ntarangwi

Published by University of Illinois Press

The bass meets the beatified in Kenya’s dynamic youth culture

Continue reading “The Street Is My Pulpit: Hip Hop & Christianity in Kenya”

New Book on Hip Hop in Morocco

Moreno Almeida, Cristina. (2017). Rap Beyond Resistance: Staging Power in Contemporary Morocco. Palgrave Macmillan. 

Continue reading “New Book on Hip Hop in Morocco”

Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati

by Msia Kibona Clark and Mickie Mwanzia Koster

Now available in paperback & on Kindle

https://www.amazon.com/Hip-Hop-Social-Change-Africa/dp/1498505805

This book examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati

by Msia Kibona Clark and Mickie Mwanzia Koster

Now available in paperback & on Kindle

https://www.amazon.com/Hip-Hop-Social-Change-Africa/dp/1498505805

This book examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

Continue reading “Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati”

Wala Bok: Une histoire orale du hip hop au Senegal (An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal)

Wala Bok: Une histoire orale du hip hop au Senegal: An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal by Fatou Kande Senghor

[Please note: This book is published in French language text.] Wala Bok: An Oral History of Hip Hop in Senegal explores and reflects on the evolution of generations of hip hop artistes and practitioners, from the early pioneers to the new kids on the block, producers, and the social critics involved in this complex movement. In Senegal, hip hop has been very political from the go, from ‘Set Setal’ cleanliness campaigns of the 80s and 90s, to the Y’en a marre movement that became instrumental to derailing the monarchic wishes of an octogenarian president to usher in a second ‘alternance’ in 2012. The images and testimonies of this movement, shaped by the recognition for cultural diversity and motivated by the quest for making the world a better place, unveil a heterogeneous eclectic community pulled between individual artistic promotion and political commitment. Includes photographs and contributions from scholars such as Greg Thomas, Eugene Adams, Ousmane Sene, Abdoulaye Niang and many hip hop artistes and practitioners in Senegal including Daara J Family, Didier Awadi, Fou Malade, Keur Gui, Daddy Bibson, Lord Alajiman, Chronik 2H, ALIF, Moona, Rapattack and many others. Kande Senghor studied cinema, civilizations and languages at the Universite Charles de Gaulle in Lille, France. She worked with the director Wim Wenders on The Invisible (2007), a documentary on women raped by the May May fighters during the civil war in Congo. She was a privileged collaborator of Sembene Ousmane. In 2006, she presented photographic works in the exhibition Snap Judgements at the invitation of Okwui Enwezor at the New York Contemporary Photography Museum. The documentary The Other in Me (2012) explores the threads in connection, identity, belonging and the Diaspora between two identical twin brothers. In 2015, her documentary film Giving Birth on the enigmatic Senegalese sculptor Seni Camara was an official selection at the Venice Biennale.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/2359260154/ref=cm_sw_r_oth_api_7aX6xbT5HXA7D

The Role of New and Social Media in Tanzanian Hip-Hop Production

The Role of New and Social Media in Tanzanian Hip-Hop Production by Msia Kibona Clark

Cahiers d’études africaines 2014/4 (N° 216)

Abstract: Tanzanian hip-hop artists are finding ways to use social media and technology to both participate in social discourse and to disseminate their music. The increased reliance on alternatives to traditional media tests the power of new technology and social media to allow artists to successfully bypass established institutions and barriers. Likewise, it tests the importance of social media in creating a space for Pan African dialogues to occur, viahip-hop. One of the earliest clues that new and social media would signal revolutionary change in the dissemination of hip-hop worldwide was the launch of MySpace in 2003. By 2010 an increasing number of hip-hop artists from Tanzania had created fan pages on Facebook, uploaded videos on YouTube, and opened Twitter accounts. This research examines the ways in which hip-hop artists in Tanzania use this social media to engage audiences, the effectiveness of these strategies in the face of an increasing number of online Tanzanians, and how social media helps artists bridge barriers to Pan African dialogues with artists across Africa and the Diaspora.

French

Le rôle des médias sociaux en Tanzanie en production hip-hop

Les artistes de hip-hop tanzaniens recherchent des moyens d’utilisation des médias sociaux et des nouvelles technologies qui leur permettent à la fois de participer à des discours sociaux et de diffuser leur musique. Le recours accru à des alternatives aux médias traditionnels questionne le pouvoir qu’ont les nouvelles technologies et les médias sociaux de soutenir les artistes tentant de contourner les institutions et les barrières établies. De même, elle interroge l’importance des médias sociaux dans la création d’un espace où surviendraient des dialogues panafricains, au travers du hip-hop. L’un des premiers indices signalant que les médias sociaux allaient engranger des changements révolutionnaires dans la dissémination mondiale du hip-hop fut le lancement de Myspace en 2003. Avant 2010, un nombre croissant d’artistes hip-hop de Tanzanie avaient créé leurs pages Facebook, téléchargé des vidéos sur Youtube, et ouvert des comptes Twitter. Cette recherche examine les manières dont les artistes de hip-hop en Tanzanie utilisent les médias sociaux pour toucher leurs publics, l’efficacité de ces stratégies auprès du nombre croissant de Tanzaniens connectés au Net, et comment les médias sociaux aident les artistes à vaincre les obstacles qui pourraient s’opposer aux dialogues panafricains avec des artistes de l’Afrique et de la diaspora.

Hip Hop and Social Change in Africa: Ni Wakati

This book examines social change in Africa through the lens of hip hop music and culture. Artists engage their African communities in a variety of ways that confront established social structures, using coded language and symbols to inform, question, and challenge. Through lyrical expression, dance, and graffiti, hip hop is used to challenge social inequality and to push for social change. The study looks across Africa and explores how hip hop is being used in different places, spaces, and moments to foster change. In this edited work, authors from a wide range of fields, including history, sociology, African and African American studies, and political science explore the transformative impact that hip hop has had on African youth, who have in turn emerged to push for social change on the continent. The powerful moment in which those that want change decide to consciously and collectively take a stand is rooted in an awareness that has much to do with time. Therefore, the book centers on African hip hop around the context of “it’s time” for change, Ni Wakati.

The book features essay by hip hop artists and activists like Amkoullel L’enfant Peulh (Mali), Kama from Kalamashaka (Kenya), Malle Marxist (Tanzania), Mejah Mbuya (Tanzania), and Slim Emcee (Uganda). The book also features a chapter co-authored by South African hip hop pioneer Shaheen Ariefdien. The book also has chapters that cover Kenya, Madagascar, North Africa, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, and Tanzania.

The book is available on Amazon

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Journal of Pan African Studies: Hip Hop in Africa

I’ve recently edited a special edition of the Journal of Pan African Studies on hip hop in Africa. With articles by myself and a diversity of other scholars writing on Kenya, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, and Zimbabwe.

● The Struggle for Hip Hop Authenticity and Against Commercialization in Tanzania  by Msia Kibona Clark

● Urban Guerrilla Poetry: The Movement Y’ en a Marre and the Socio-Political Influences of Hip Hop in Senegal by Marame Gueye

● “Chant Down the System ‘till Babylon Falls”: The Political Dimensions of Underground Hip Hop and Urban Grooves in Zimbabwe by Katja Kellerer

● From Compton to Cape Town: Black(faceless)ness and the Appropriation of Gangsta Rap in Die Antwoord’s “Fok Julle Naaiers” by Lanisa Kitchiner

The Hip Hop Revolution in Kenya: Ukoo Flani Mau Mau, Youth Politics and Memory, 1990-2012 by Mickie Mwanzia Koster

● Swag’ and ‘cred’: Representing Hip-hop in the African City by Caroline Mos

● Hip Hop Music as a Youth Medium for Cultural Struggle in Zanzibar by Shani Omari

● Troubling the Trope of “Rapper as Modern Griot” by Damon Sajnani

● “The Blueprint: The Gift and The Curse” of American Hip Hop Culture for Nigeria’s Millennial Youth by Stephanie Shonekan

Check out the issue: http://www.jpanafrican.com/vol6no3.htm

ImageCover photo is Thiat from the Senegalese group Keur Gui performing at the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival. Photo by Msia Kibona Clark.