Posted in Africa, Hip Hop African Article, South Africa

Review: “Skop skiet en Donder” by COPA

This week I had the pleasure to Review another up and coming Artist named COPA from Cape Town South Africa. The song I’ll be mentioning is “skop skiet en donder” which I have no idea what it says/means but for me, it’s more about the beat of a song over the lyrics any day. The beat to this song had a throwback 90’s hip hop feel to it which I appreciated. I was not expecting that 90’s feel prior to listening to the song. The second thing I thought of whilst listening to this song was, it would do great in an action movie! Or one of those movies centered around an undercover agent/investigator. Go ahead and listen to it, I’m sure you’ll agree with me! Even though I could not understand most of what the artist was saying, I can infer that the goal of the artist was to emphasize the throwback vibe of the foundation of hip-hop and also incorporate his own culture with the language/dialect he speaks in. Apart from COPA’s music, the aesthetic theme of his art on his song covers gives a sort of contrast to the throwback feel of the beat/lyrics of the song, which is quite interesting! Before visiting his social media pages, I assumed the art that went along with his music to have an old-fashioned look to it but I was pleasantly surprised! The galactic look to COPA’s work is the futuristic contrast to the 90’s vibe to his songs. All in all, I suggest anyone who is a fan of 90’s hip hop as well as South African hip hop to definitely check out COPA’s work, you’ll be in for a pleasant surprise.

Here are the various links to his social media/ songs:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/classic_copes/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClassicCopes/

Sound Cloud: https://www.soundcloud.com/copa_the1

 

Posted in Africa, CFP

Call for Papers: Book on Hip Hop & Social Justice

Hip Hop and Social Justice

Edited Volume Call for Papers

Editors: Lakeyta M. Bonnette-Bailey, Georgia State University, Department of Political Science & Adolphus G. Belk, Jr., Winthrop University, Department of Political Science

In 2017, Hip-Hop celebrates its 44th year of existence as a cultural form. Since its inception in urban America, Hip-Hop has transformed into a global phenomenon, serving as a political, social, and cultural mode of expression for people of various races and ethnicities. Not only has rap music experienced an increase in the diversity of its creators and consumers, it has also witnessed an expansion of the political activities of Hip-Hop artists as well as a surge in its influence on political movements across the world. Thus, Hip-Hop is a critical voice for marginalized communities due to its ability to disseminate knowledge, facilitate awareness, and promote mobilization and action for many social injustices.

Hip-Hop and Social Justice is a seminal text that utilizes different methodologies to examine the uses of various components of Hip-Hop culture to engage diverse political, social, and economic concerns. The goal of the volume is to document and analyze the ways in which Hip-Hop music, artists, scholars, and activists have discussed, promoted, or supported social justice challenges. This manuscript is soliciting chapters that examine the relationships between Hip-Hop culture, political engagement, and social justice work over the last four decades.

The modes in which Hip-Hop has participated in social action are not limited to song creations, campaigns and elections, voter mobilization, and/or monetary contributions. Therefore, this edited volume will be interdisciplinary and focus on the number of ways in which Hip-Hop has been involved in or led social justice fights not only in the U.S., but worldwide. This volume will explore topics such as: Hip Hop and education, Hip Hop and the Black Lives Matter movement, Hip Hop and mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex, Hip Hop and electoral politics, Hip Hop and gender and sexuality, Hip Hop and public policy, Hip Hop, race and racism and Hip Hop and social justice globally.

We hope that you are interested in contributing to this peer-reviewed volume. If so, then please email either Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey at lbonnette@gsu.edu or Adolphus G. Belk, Jr. at belka@winthrop.edu with an abstract of 500 words or less of your proposed contributions and a brief bio. The abstract should clearly identify your research question, thesis, methods of analysis, results, and the disciplinary home of the research, if any. All abstracts are due November 15, 2017.

Posted in Africa, BBoys, CFP, Diaspora, DJs, Events, Female Emcees, Films, graffiti, Press Release

2018 Trinity Hip Hop Festival

The call for submissions from performers and presenters at the 13th annual Trinity International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, Connecticut. The festival will be held April 6-8, 2018. The yearly festival brings together artists, organizers, & scholars from around the world for 3 days of workshops, performances, battles, lectures, film showings, and networking. Submissions are due by 17th of November, 2017.For more information check out the festival site: http://trinityhiphop.com/call-for-submissions-2018-festival/

Posted in Burkina Faso, Events, Interview, Podcasts

HHAP Episode 12: Burkinabe Rap Dialogue

This is episode 12 of the podcast, and the fourth and last in a series of episodes recorded live at the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, Connecticut. The festival took place the 6th to the 9th of April, 2017. This episode features a conversation with Mathurin Soubéiga, Continue reading “HHAP Episode 12: Burkinabe Rap Dialogue”

Posted in Events, Interview, Podcasts, Uganda

HHAP Episode 11: Bavubuka Foundation and Indigenous Hip Hop in Africa

This is episode 11 of the podcast, and the third in a series of episodes recorded live at the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, Connecticut. The festival took place the 6th to the 9th of April, 2017. This episode is a conversation with Babaluku and Gilbert from Bavubuka Foundation in Kampala, Uganda. Continue reading “HHAP Episode 11: Bavubuka Foundation and Indigenous Hip Hop in Africa”

Posted in Africa, Female Emcees, Hip Hop African Article, South Africa

Nadia Nakai – Like Me vs Nadia Rose – Station

This post is dedicated to the comparison of two talented female emcees, from two different countries that share a first name. Nadia Nakai and Nadia Rose both speak on the fact that no one can step to them, whether lyrically or otherwise. With upbeat rhythms and fast rap patterns one could definitely draw a comparison between their styles of delivery and topic choice, however the visuals to accompany the video could not be more different. Nakai brought the b-girl aspect of hip hop to her video, whereas Rose’s Station is literally at a train station saying that she has the go. Station starts with a uptempo boom-bap pattern beat, and a song that would leave you understanding that she won’t be in the same position, space or even place as she is always on the go. Meanwhile, you cannot forget Nadia Nakai, nor can you get close to have the relentless flow that she professes to use throughout the track. Typical in Nakai fashion Nadia flaunts what she has and challenges anyone who thinks that they can step to her about it.

Meanwhile, Nadia Rose calls out fans who talk about her as if she wont talk about it to their face, and when they do reply they want to keep up and if it weren’t obvious at this point, they cannot. Even down to the more specifics of the beats that they decided to use for the songs are tough, as Nakai’s beat for Like Me sounds like a Swiss beats classic and, Rose’s beat selection sounded like a Neptune’s sound. The overall message trying to be conveyed as previously mentioned is that you cant step to these talented ladies with anything short of amazing. Both Femcees also defy the standard representation of what’s ladylike for an emcee, with the overaggressive crumping in Like Me, and to the aggressive styles in which she tells you that you can’t see her in Station.

Nadia Rose – Station [Official Video]

Nadia Nakai – Like Me

Posted in Africa, Hip Hop References

It’s A Party : A Review of Turnt by Branco

Branco’s Turnt is what I would classify as a party song, as the song title suggests. While listening to the song I wanted to dance because of the contrast between a smooth and hard beat. Branco is direct in his lyrics and his message is plain and simple, he is living his life, working hard and making money.The style of the song reminds me of some of the mainstream hip hop in America, celebrating success. To my knowledge, many American hip hop artist come from a struggle or did not have the easiest life. It is very well possible that Branco is no different, as he raps about his daily llife of working hard and getting money.

Although the intent of the song was to be a “club banger”, I cannot dismiss the language used. Women were referred to as b*tches and vulgar language also had a strong presence. I am not attacking the artist’s word choice, as this is not uncommon in hip hop, but women are often objectified and sexualized in music and this song reinforces that. In this course, we discussed gender identity in hip hop as well as sexism . The culture of hiphop is the art of expression. The controversy surounding  hip hop music relates to the lack of respect for women, the lack of concious art, as well as the presence of violence. In attemoting to disect the song, I got, live your life and care less about what others have to say.  Turnt, put simply, was a song that was meant to be used to turn up and be care free. I think Branco did a pretty good job at tackling that. Because hip hop is an art for expression, the music you make should be represenative of what is important to you at the moment in addition to how you see the world. I think it is safe to assume that Branco is younger and therefore right now he is just enjoying life, as we all should. Stay Turnt!

“Turnt” – Branco

Posted in Diaspora, Events, Podcasts

HHAP Episode 10: Hip Hop and the State in Cuba

This is episode 10 of the podcast, and the second in a series of episodes recorded live at the Trinity International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, Connecticut. The festival took place the 6th to the 9th of April, 2017. This episode was a panel titled “Independent and Political Hip Hop in Cuba” with Pedro Vidal of the Cuban Soul Foundation in Miami, Florida and hip hop artists David D Omni and Escuadron Patriota, who live in Cuba. The panel was an interesting discussion on hip hop and the state in Cuba.

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 10: Hip Hop and the State in Cuba”