Posted in Africa, Hip Hop African Article, South Africa

Review: “Skop skiet en Donder” by COPA

This week I had the pleasure to Review another up and coming Artist named COPA from Cape Town South Africa. The song I’ll be mentioning is “skop skiet en donder” which I have no idea what it says/means but for me, it’s more about the beat of a song over the lyrics any day. The beat to this song had a throwback 90’s hip hop feel to it which I appreciated. I was not expecting that 90’s feel prior to listening to the song. The second thing I thought of whilst listening to this song was, it would do great in an action movie! Or one of those movies centered around an undercover agent/investigator. Go ahead and listen to it, I’m sure you’ll agree with me! Even though I could not understand most of what the artist was saying, I can infer that the goal of the artist was to emphasize the throwback vibe of the foundation of hip-hop and also incorporate his own culture with the language/dialect he speaks in. Apart from COPA’s music, the aesthetic theme of his art on his song covers gives a sort of contrast to the throwback feel of the beat/lyrics of the song, which is quite interesting! Before visiting his social media pages, I assumed the art that went along with his music to have an old-fashioned look to it but I was pleasantly surprised! The galactic look to COPA’s work is the futuristic contrast to the 90’s vibe to his songs. All in all, I suggest anyone who is a fan of 90’s hip hop as well as South African hip hop to definitely check out COPA’s work, you’ll be in for a pleasant surprise.

Here are the various links to his social media/ songs:

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/classic_copes/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ClassicCopes/

Sound Cloud: https://www.soundcloud.com/copa_the1

 

Posted in Africa, CFP

Call for Papers: Book on Hip Hop & Social Justice

Hip Hop and Social Justice

Edited Volume Call for Papers

Editors: Lakeyta M. Bonnette-Bailey, Georgia State University, Department of Political Science & Adolphus G. Belk, Jr., Winthrop University, Department of Political Science

In 2017, Hip-Hop celebrates its 44th year of existence as a cultural form. Since its inception in urban America, Hip-Hop has transformed into a global phenomenon, serving as a political, social, and cultural mode of expression for people of various races and ethnicities. Not only has rap music experienced an increase in the diversity of its creators and consumers, it has also witnessed an expansion of the political activities of Hip-Hop artists as well as a surge in its influence on political movements across the world. Thus, Hip-Hop is a critical voice for marginalized communities due to its ability to disseminate knowledge, facilitate awareness, and promote mobilization and action for many social injustices.

Hip-Hop and Social Justice is a seminal text that utilizes different methodologies to examine the uses of various components of Hip-Hop culture to engage diverse political, social, and economic concerns. The goal of the volume is to document and analyze the ways in which Hip-Hop music, artists, scholars, and activists have discussed, promoted, or supported social justice challenges. This manuscript is soliciting chapters that examine the relationships between Hip-Hop culture, political engagement, and social justice work over the last four decades.

The modes in which Hip-Hop has participated in social action are not limited to song creations, campaigns and elections, voter mobilization, and/or monetary contributions. Therefore, this edited volume will be interdisciplinary and focus on the number of ways in which Hip-Hop has been involved in or led social justice fights not only in the U.S., but worldwide. This volume will explore topics such as: Hip Hop and education, Hip Hop and the Black Lives Matter movement, Hip Hop and mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex, Hip Hop and electoral politics, Hip Hop and gender and sexuality, Hip Hop and public policy, Hip Hop, race and racism and Hip Hop and social justice globally.

We hope that you are interested in contributing to this peer-reviewed volume. If so, then please email either Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey at lbonnette@gsu.edu or Adolphus G. Belk, Jr. at belka@winthrop.edu with an abstract of 500 words or less of your proposed contributions and a brief bio. The abstract should clearly identify your research question, thesis, methods of analysis, results, and the disciplinary home of the research, if any. All abstracts are due November 15, 2017.

Posted in Africa, Hip Hop African Videos, Nigeria, Student Projects

Review: “Str8 Up” by Phlow

This week, I had the pleasure to review a song called “Str8 Up” by a Lagos based female hip hop artist: Phlow. She’s apart of Str8Buttah Productions crew and has a lot of other work out like her EP, “Mind, Body & Phlow”, her upcoming LP “Flux” and consistently features DJ Teck-Zilla who helps with instrumentals in most of her work. My first impression of the accompanied video was, “Wow! This is unique!”. Not only did I like the production of the video, setting and good quality, but the way the video was structured was quite unique! Here and there the lyrics would be animated on the screen to  emphasize the expressions of Phlow which was different than what I usually see in hip hop music videos. Not only that, but the beat to this song is like the young-ins say nowadays is “fire emoji”! I realized my head was bopping to the beat without much work. The beat had a modern hip-hop feel and went pretty well with Phlow’s lyrics. The overall feel of the song/video had a tough but determined and unapologetic theme to it which can definitely relate to a majority of how our recent female hip hop artists portray themselves in their songs/music videos today. All in all, I’d definitely give Phlow a round of applause for the effort put into the production and content of her music, it should not be unnoticed! Her unique unapologetic style is very inspiring not only for females in the music industry, but females like myself, who aren’t artists but can appreciate and respect other women for expressing themselves without anyone else’s permission or approval. Needless to say, Phlow has just gained a new fan!

Here are links to her works:

YouTube video to “Str8 Up”: https://youtu.be/_OMvWrozbIo

SoundCloud:https://soundcloud.com/phlowetry/str8-up

Audiomack: https://www.audiomack.com/song/diamond-media-360/str8-up

 

Posted in Africa, BBoys, CFP, Diaspora, DJs, Events, Female Emcees, Films, graffiti, Press Release

2018 Trinity Hip Hop Festival

The call for submissions from performers and presenters at the 13th annual Trinity International Hip Hop Festival in Hartford, Connecticut. The festival will be held April 6-8, 2018. The yearly festival brings together artists, organizers, & scholars from around the world for 3 days of workshops, performances, battles, lectures, film showings, and networking. Submissions are due by 17th of November, 2017.For more information check out the festival site: http://trinityhiphop.com/call-for-submissions-2018-festival/

Posted in Africa

We All Need A Soul Dreamer

Njabulo Skondo (born September 26, 1995), known as N-jay.52, is a South African rapper from Engcobo, Eastern Cape. N-jay.52 embarked on his musical career as a teenager releasing a mixtape that sparked the birth of 3rd Grave 1.0.2. In 2011 he released his first Mixtape titled The Son of Victoria and the following year, he released a sequel of the project, The Son of Victoria:2.

N-jay.52 began to gain major recognition in 2016 after the release of his debut single “From Me” which is taken from his upcoming critically acclaimed studio EP titled “Lord Forgive Me For My Dreams”. He enjoys the moderate success of his mix tape titled Bipolar released in 2016 and currently has a video out for the mixtapes standout single “For The City”. This single is from his upcoming LP titled “cEvil:”A Townships Tale”. This song is about a South African dreamer who shares his experiences when he dreamed as a child and how he dreams now as a young man.

This is the type of music I enjoy listening to. Artist that sings/raps about REAL life experiences make REAL music! The amount of personal information N-jay.52 exposes in this song means he isn’t afraid to share his journey to success. This song could come off as vulnerable but that is not the case at all. He is sharing his story to tell the listeners that you don’t have to be stuck in your situation. I would definitely be looking out for more music by Njay52, and Soul Dreamin has just been added to my “fave song” list. He is an artist that everyone is to look out for.

No matter what you are going through remember to always stay committed to your dreams/goals. Being aware of situations means you have taken the first step in realizing that change needs to be made. Never let anyone determine your destiny for you. Your life is yours and you’re the only one who can make it better for yourself.

 

Posted in Africa, Botswana, Female Emcees, Ghana, Kenya, Podcasts, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe

HHAP Episode 14: African (Women) MCs & Hip Hop Lyricists

This episode features the music of several MCs from across Africa. We depart from the interview format and bring you music from some of our favorite (women) MCs. This is essentially a mixtape of diverse female voices in African hip hop. These MCs live in different countries, seek different languages, and speak on diverse topics. In each of these songs, the artists performing deliver strong, hard hitting lyrics that are both classic hip hop and representative of African styles of hip hop. See the artists’ social media pages for more information. Additionally, some of the artists have their work on iTunes. Those links are provided.

Continue reading “HHAP Episode 14: African (Women) MCs & Hip Hop Lyricists”